Sunday, 21 September 2014

Reviewing Performance - Dos and Donts

Appraisal, performance reviews and employee evaluations are the least favorite of most of the workforce that is on its receiving end. The bosses enjoy the prospect of giving their feedback and/or analysis of your work ethics, behavior, achievements (or lack thereof). What to say? How to hear what they have to say? What to do and what NEVER to attempt? Here’s a run down:

Filling in the Details
The best habit that I observed from one of my ex bosses was to keep a record of all tasks done on Google drive. This practice helped when at the end of the day (or fiscal year), one had to describe the inaccuracies or give justification for non-performance or why a certain task was abandoned or sidelined. OR how you managed to achieve daunting tasks in spite of numerous obstacles. Things happen, POAs change; it’s a dynamic work environment with volatile conditions is economies and commerce globally. Having a routinely updated journal of tasks will be helpful in building a case for your objective appraisal.

Attitude not Aptitude
The attitude of the employee and how he performs his work is more important than the fact that he does achieve his goals or even exceeds them. The behavioral competencies across the board for people matter a lot more than their technical know how. Today, the focus of management and HR is on a well rounded individual with grooming and acumen to move ahead in the corporate world. An exceptional performer, with a lack of tact and candor, needs to stop and take a good look at him before arguing on his performance rating.

The appraisal process now, is not in isolation. It is a 360 degree view from all stakeholders of the firm. Each move you make, each email you send (or don’t), serves as basis for your evaluation. Following up on and completing tasks in a timely fashion is commendable. Even better is doing it all with a can do attitude, persistence and the resilience to bring improvement in your field of

Nope. I don’t!
Most of the evaluations are not very off the mark. Being honest and reflecting on yourself will help you see what your review is all about. If you have a grievance or do not accept your work evaluation, you have the right to contest it. Try discussing with your manager, and if that doesn't work, move up the hierarchy. As a last resort, set up a meeting with your HR and settle matters cordially. No one likes sour grapes, but in the event that you are right, you will be supported by HR as it cant be a one off incident and a bad manager is like a daisy in a mustard field, conspicuous and easily identifiable.